IDEAL Window Installation – Improving Best Practices

You bought high-performance windows, but is the install going to complement their performance or detract from it? The enclosure insulation, airtightness and moisture control should be continuous. But too often where the window frame meets the building we see breaks in insulation, air leaks and vapor traps – all setting the stage for discomfort, inefficiency and moisture damages. The ubiquitous can of Great Stuff by Dow Chemical provides a connection that is neither airtight or healthy – with foam residue and waste chemicals left to bioaccumulate in our environment already choking on plastic.

Cans makes good long-term toxic garbage.

We can improve our window install by using more natural, safe and healthy materials that are easier to install and more reliably durable for the long term. No builder likes struggling to insulate around windows with messy spray foam insulation or backer rod and caulk. These options are tough to install well, and are often vapor closed, short term, and generate a lot of waste. Stop it. There is a better way. You might say we have an IDEAL solution based on Havelock Sheep Wool insulation and Pro Clima tapes.

Read More

NOT IDEAL

NOT IDEAL

Cans makes good long-term toxic garbage.

Cans makes good long-term toxic garbage.

Building Technology Uses Wool for Better Health

SAN FRANCISCO (April 11, 2017) — People are smart, and people breathe, but most of us wouldn't think the same of the walls that surround our living rooms, bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens.

A couple of building professionals are trying to change that perception with what they believe is the smartest, most breathable wall ever developed.

Called the ‘Smart Wall,’ the system is made of efficient, resilient and sustainable products, including Havelock Wool sheep’s wool insulation, Intello wall lining membranes and Gutex insulation board.

Kirkland camper finds eco-friendly solution

Kirkland camper finds eco-friendly solution

A Kirkland camper manufacturer has signed an agreement with Havelock Wool to insulate all of its eco-friendly trailers with sheep’s wool instead of foam board.

The partnership comes after Homegrown Trailers outfitted some of its newest mobile units with the all-natural product and decided wool was a better solution than the polystyrene panels used in the company’s inaugural designs.

New Wall System Developed Using Organic Wool Insulation

New Wall System Developed Using Organic Wool Insulation

People are smart, and people breathe, but most of us wouldn't think the same of the walls that surround our living rooms, bedrooms and kitchens.

A couple of building professionals are trying to change that perception with what they believe is the smartest, most breathable wall ever developed.

Nature’s Choice for Home Insulation

Nature’s Choice for Home Insulation

At first glance, the photo is unsettling: A child inside a newly constructed home, not just playing near insulation, but sticking her arms inside of it. For Andrew Legge, founder of Sparks, Nevada–based Havelock Wool, the image encapsulates what sets his product apart from the rest. “Who takes their kids around insulation? No one,” says Legge, referring to the photo on his insulation company’s pamphlet.

Insulating Homes with Sheep Wool

Insulating Homes with Sheep Wool

Havelock Wool is pioneering the use of unaltered sheep’s wool as an environmentally-friendly and renewable insulation material for U.S. homes and buildings

Wool has been keeping both sheep and humans warm for centuries. But now one company is using shorn sheep’s wool to give fiberglass and foam insulation a run for their money.

Healthier and Smarter Decisions in Homebuilding

What inspired Havelock Wool?

I started Havelock Wool with another American who has a similar love for all things New Zealand. The farmers there were looking for new markets and uses for their wool, and the American market—which generates only 1% of the global annual yield of wool—is a great place to introduce this time-tested, high-quality natural product.

Is the insulation clothing-grade wool? Our friends in New Zealand think we’re using better wool than necessary to effectively insulate homes, but it carries a significantly higher fiber diameter than Merino wool and is more coarse. This means that it’s comfortable to the touch but not as soft as Merino wool, which is prized for its comfort.